The Federal Government is mandating new safety standards for automobile roofs, the first such new standards in thirty years, according to the New York Times Wheels Blog.  Automobiles are currently required to have roofs that can withstand pressure equal to one and a half times the vehicle’s curb weight, with that pressure applied to one side of the roof only, up to a six thousand pound maximum.  Vehicles over 6,000 pounds are not currently regulated.

The new standard, to be implemented by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, is that the vehicle’s roof must be able to withstand three times the weight of the vehicle, with pressure applied first to one side of the roof and then to the other side of the roof.  Safety experts claim that the two sided test better approximates the conditions a vehicle experiences in a roll over situation.  The new standard also removes the six thousand pound cap on vehicles and brings vehicles in the 6,000 to 10,000 pound range under the regulations.

The NHTSA hopes that the tougher standard will prevent deaths from rollover crashes.  The Administration’s data shows 10,000 deaths annually from rollover crashes, under the current standard.  In the Administration’s press release, Transportation Secretary Ray Lahood states, “These new standards go a long way toward reducing deaths, but safety belts are the first, most important step everyone should take to protecting themselves and their families.” 

The phase in for the new requirements begins in September 2012.  The Administration has also mandated electronic stability control systems which will also help to prevent rollovers from occurring.

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